Historical Destinations Archives - Page 2 of 3 - GreeceMe

Ancient Delos Island

Delos is located in the heart of the Cyclades, between Mykonos, Tinos and Syros and it is a narrow piece of land from shale, which relies on bare soil on the surface of the archipelago. You will land on the ancient port at the west coast. In front of the pier you can see the square Ermaiston or Kompetaliaston (Liberalized Romans and slaves Association), an open paved square with shrines chapels and shops, in which there were the established guilds of Italian merchants. From there, the ancient road passes by two galleries, one of the Macedon king Philip and the

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The castle of Mystras

Six kilometers northwest of Sparta lay the now ruined Byzantine city of Mystras, which was a milestone in the history of culture and art. In the mid 13th century, the Franks had conquered the Peloponnese. The Villehardouin II built in 1249 the castle on the east side of Taygetus at the top (620 m) of a steep mountain called cheese. He incorporated Mystras at the core of his imperial possessions, launching a glorious history that made its cycle after six centuries of drama. In 1249 the French Prince built on the Hill Myzithra the famous namesake castle, which was soon

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The Monasteries of Meteora

Shortly after Kalambaka lies the picturesque village of Kastraki, built at the base of the giant rocks of Meteora. The huge rocks of Meteora lie between the mountains Koziakas and Antichasia. This masterpiece of nature reveals all its glory for centuries, and is a unique geological phenomenon of beauty and an important monument of Christianity.  The imposing cut off between the rocks, the height of which reaches in some cases 400 m, is a unique geological phenomenon. The rocks cover an area of about thirty kilometers. Meteora is, after the Holy Mountain, the biggest monastic complex in Greece. That’s why

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The historic town of Amphipolis

At a distance of about 100km from Thessaloniki, heading to Kavala and beyond the bridge of the Strymon River, between low hills, lie the ruins of ancient Amphipolis. Amphipolis was situated at a height of 154 m on a natural-fortress hill near the mount Pangeo, 5 km from the sea on the eastern bank of the Strymon. A twist of the Strymon River protects the western city walls. The all around view is breathtaking. In the background you can see the sea line of Thassos Island and the conical shape of Mount Athos. On the northern side you can see

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The historic City of Corinth

Ancient Corinth was one of the largest and most important cities of ancient Greece. Inhabited in the Neolithic Age, the origin of its inhabitants was not clarified. The ancient city of Corinth was built in the plain below the fortress of Acrocorinth. The ruins of Ancient Corinth are located 9 km south of the modern city. The entrance to the site is now at the southwest side. From the entrance head to the central market area which in antiquity used to be entered by the Lecheos Street. The street connected the city to the port at the Corinthian Gulf. This

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The Roman city of Nikopolis

At the south-western side of Epirus at the cape of Preveza lays the Roman city called Nikopolis. In 31 BC, Octavianus Augustus founded the city after the naval battle of Actium. Epictetus (AD 89) and many other intellectuals of the period congregated in Nikopolis. The city got populated gradually in the period of Byzantine. In the Early Byzantine and Roman period, it flourished as the capital of the province of Old Epirus (Epirus Vetus). Nowadays, in the area, the festival of Actium is celebrated in every four years in which many contests are held, such as racing, athletic and musical

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The location of ancient Mycenae

The Mycenae, the palace of the legendary Agamemnon is one of the most important archaeological sites of the Peloponnese. The position of the citadel of Mycenae was privileged and strategic. Naturally and artificially fortified, it not only supervises the entire Argolid plain but it also controls all the passages leading out of the Argolid. Thanks to this privileged position the Mycenaeans had under their control the trade with the southern Greece, Asia Minor, Cyprus and Egypt. As we are informed by Homer in the Iliad, the ruler of Mycenae dominated the Corinthia, Achaia, and of the many islands of the

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The ancient city of Vergina

To the west, southwest ends of the plain of Thessaloniki, at the northern edge of Pieria, east of Aliakmon river lie Vergina and Palatitsia, two neighboring villages that define the area of the town of Aiges, the Macedonians’ capital until the early fourth century BC and the area of the royal necropolis. The excavations started in 1861 by French archaeologist L. Heuzey and were continued from 1938 to today. The monumental palace, parts of the ancient city and its fortification, the theater and numerous Macedonian tombs were brought to light by the excavations. In parallel, north of the ancient city

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The historic town of Nafplio

Nafplion or Nauplion is a city of Peloponnese, capital of Argolida and the main port of the eastern Peloponnese. It is one of the most picturesque cities, and was the capital of the newly formed Greek state in the years 1828 – 1833. Nafplion is known for Bourtzi, a small fort built on an island in the harbor, the Palamidi, a Venetian fortress that dominates the city, the Akronafplia (in Turkish Itch Kale), another Venetian fortress, built on the homonymous peninsula. According to Greek mythology, the site of the present city was founded by Nauplius. The site was fortified with

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The ancient city of Eretria

The ruins of ancient Eretria are scattered beneath the modern city, across the area reaching from the coast up to the hill at the north, where was the Acropolis. The city was protected by a strong wall, built in the archaic period and repaired in the 4th century BC. It started at the citadel and reached to the port. The western part of the wall lied just before the stream that flowed at the west end of town and at its extension there was a breakwater, which now is sunk below the sea surface. The east wall also reached to

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